Togiak is in Newsweek!

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Togiak is in Newsweek!

Postby marymatt718 » Sat Jun 06, 2015 6:45 am

This weeks's edition of Newsweek Magazine has an article featuring, of all places, our humble little village of Togiak. The article is about climate change, and is called Baked Alaska. How cool is that?!?

Okay, so the climate's not cool , per se, :| , but Togiak is... sorta.... you know what I mean! ;)
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Re: Togiak is in Newsweek!

Postby Noble » Mon Jul 20, 2015 2:29 pm

Mary Matt,

Read the article. It sounds like the warming trend could have a huge impact on the Togiak First Peoples. Did the author over state it, or are things tough for those who have historically hunted and fished for their food?

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Re: Togiak is in Newsweek!

Postby Bushteachers » Mon Jul 20, 2015 3:26 pm

Noble wrote:Mary Matt,

Read the article. It sounds like the warming trend could have a huge impact on the Togiak First Peoples. Did the author over state it, or are things tough for those who have historically hunted and fished for their food?

Noble
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Re: Togiak is in Newsweek!

Postby marymatt718 » Mon Jul 20, 2015 10:14 pm

Yes, it has definitely affected the village and the villagers. There is a winter moose hunt that puts food on the table for many extended families here. The moose are waaaay out away from the village and the easiest way to get to them is by snow machine on the frozen river...but the river hasn't been frozen enough to do that for very many days for the past two winters. These people count on that meat. To buy meat at the local AC store is horribly expensive, $8-9 a pound for hamburger, and that isn't something a large extended family can afford to buy very often. (By extended family I mean several men hunting for children, spouse, siblings, in-laws, and grandparents or any elder... anyone remotely related to them or anyone in need.)

Berries have also been in short supply. The snow pack keeps the berry plants on the tundra from drying out due to the winter winds. If there is no snow pack the ground gets too dry, and the berry plants are damaged. There were almost no berries last summer, except way up on the larger more remote hills, and those are harder to get to across a squishy summer tundra.

The politicians want to deny there's anything going on, because they are "paid" to ignore the signs, but the villagers know what's going on. They could have told you years ago that things were changing, and now they can tell you it's accelerating.

People ask me, when I go home to Texas for the summer, don't they get some kind of oil dividend and why can't they just live on that and buy their food like everyone else? Yes, a yearly dividend does come from the sale of the oil, but it isn't nearly enough to live on and to try to do so would be the death of their culture. Some of these tribes in Alaska are tens of thousands of years old as a people.

Eventually there will be no more oil. Even though my idiot senator, from Texas, Ted Cruz, (excuse me while I spit!) wants to believe otherwise, oil isn't a renewable resource; when it's gone it will take a few million more years to make more. As the whaling captain in Big Miracle said (that native actor used to work at our school), when the oil is gone, who's going to feed their children? The oil and the dividend will run out, but Subsistence must continue, and the native parents must continue to teach it to their children or none of them may survive. With this climate warm-up, the opportunities to teach those lessons are getting harder and harder to come by.
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